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Roman Signifer AD43 by Chris Collingwood. - ChrisCollingwood.com

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Roman Signifer AD43 by Chris Collingwood.


Roman Signifer AD43 by Chris Collingwood.

Item Code : CCP0054Roman Signifer AD43 by Chris Collingwood. - This EditionAdd any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout! Buy 1 Get 1 Half Price!
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PRINTSigned limited edition of 950 prints. Paper size 13 inches x 8 inches (33cm x 20cm)Artist : Chris Collingwood15 Off!Now : 40.00

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Other editions of this item : Roman Signifer AD43 by Chris Collingwood. CCP0054
TYPEDESCRIPTIONSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSPRICEPURCHASING
ARTIST
PROOF
Limited edition of 20 artist proofs. Image size 13 inches x 8 inches (33cm x 20cm)Artist : Chris Collingwood10 Off!Add any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!Now : 50.00VIEW EDITION...
ORIGINAL
DRAWING
Original pencil drawing produced on high quality art paper.Paper size 20 inches x 14 inches (51cm x 36cm)Artist : Chris Collingwood125 Off!Add any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!Now : 325.00VIEW EDITION...

This Week's Half Price Art

 Cannon to right of them,<br>Cannon to left of them,<br>Cannon in front of them,<br>Volleyd and thunderd,<br>Stormd at with shot and shell, <br>Boldly they rode and well<br>Into the jaws of death,<br>into the mouth of hell<br>rode the six hundred. <br>The following is part of a letter from an officer of the Light Brigade who was camped near Balaclava on October 27th: ...there was no hesitation: down our fellows went at a gallop, through a fire in front and on both flanks, which emptied our saddles and knocked over our horses by scores. I do not think that one man flinched in the whole brigade, though every one allows that so hot a fire was hardly ever seen.

Stormd at with Shot and Shell, 17th Light Dragoons (Lancers) Oct 25 1854 at Balaclava by Chris Collingwood. (GS)
Half Price! - 275.00
The Siege of Paris lasted from September 19th 1870 to January 28th 1871, and borught about the French surrender and the end of the Franco-Prussian War.
The Siege of Paris by Jean Louis Ernest Meissonier.
Half Price! - 30.00
 In the predawn light the last Pz.Kpfw. VI Tiger II (Kingtigers) of 2nd Company 506th Heavy Tank Battalion, drive south across the Arnhem bridge to prepare for the upcoming counter-attack to retake Elst and the Nymegen road bridge.

Finale at Arnhem, Holland, 24th September 1944 by David Pentland. (GL)
Half Price! - 300.00
 After coming out of the British Square The 17th Lancers charge by the 58th Regiment. The Battle of Ulundi took place at the Zulu capital of Ulundi on 4th July 1879.  Ulundi became the last battle to be fought during the Zulu war and the British victory finally broke the military power of the Zulu Nation.  The battle began at 6 a.m. when Buller led out an advance guard of mounted troops and South African irregulars.  The British force comprised of five companies of the 80th regiment in square in four ranks, with two Gatling Guns in the centres, two 9-pounders on the left flank and two 7-pounders on the right. The 90th Light Infantry with four companies of the 94th regiment made up the left face with two more 7-pounders.  On the right face were the 1st Battalion of the 13th Light Infantry, four companies of the 58th Regiment, two 7-pounders and two 9-pounders. The rear face was composed of two companies of the 94th Regiment and two companies of the 2nd Battalion of the 21st Regiment.  In the middle of the square were headquarters staff, No. 5 company of the Royal Engineers whhich was led by Lt John Chard who had commanded the troops at Rorkes Drift, the 2nd Native Natal Contingent, fifty wagons and carts with reserve ammunition and hospital wagons. Bullers horsemen protected the front and both flanks of the square. A rearguard of two squadrons of the 17th Lancers and a troop of Natal Native Horse followed.  In total the British force stood at just over 5300 against the Zulu warrior regiments in total over 15000.  The Zulu warriors charged again and again at the square but with the strong British firepower of tifle and gatling gun, they could not get close.  As the Zulu warriors strength weakened, Lord Chelmsford ordered the cavalry to mount, and the 17th Lancers and the 1st Kings Dragoon Guards along with colonial cavalry were ordered to charge the now fleeing Zulus.  The Zulus fled towards the high ground with the cavalry in pursuit.  The Lancers were checked at the Mbilane stream by the fire of a concealed party of Zulus, causing a number casualties before the 17th Lancers overcame the Zulu resistance.  The pursuit continued until not one living Zulu remained on the Mahlabatini plain, with members of the Natal Native Horse, Natal Native Contingent and Woods Irregulars slaughtering the Zulu wounded, done in revenge for the massacre at Isandlwana.

Battle of Ulundi by Brian Palmer.
Half Price! - 70.00

 Colonel William C Oates leads his regiment up the slopes of Little Round Top to attack the left flank of the Union army on the second day of fighting at the Battle of Gettysburg.

Confederate Officer, 15th Alabama Infantry Regiment 1863 by Mark Churms.
Half Price! - 40.00
 This was the Austrians fourth attempt to relieve their besieged garrison of Mantua.
The Battle of Rivoli by Carl Vernet.
Half Price! - 33.00
The story of the SAS through all major theatres they were involved in. From the start, North Africa 1941, Malaya 1952-1956, Borneo1965-1966, Aden 1967, Oman 1971-1976, Iranian Embassy 1980, Falklands Conflict 1982, Iraq 1991. The middle area shows Col. D. Stirling DSO, and the four single figures depict the different section, Boat, Mountain, Air and Mobility.

The SAS Full Circle by Graeme Lothian. (P)
Half Price! - 3000.00
 The Battle of Isandlwana on 22 January 1879 was the first major encounter in the Anglo-Zulu War between the British Empire and the Zulu Kingdom.  Eleven days after the British commenced their invasion of Zululand in South Africa, a Zulu force of some 10,000-12,000 warriors attacked a portion of the British main column consisting of about 1,800 British, colonial and native troops and perhaps 400 civilians.  The Zulus were equipped mainly with the traditional Assegai iron spears and cow-hide shields, but also had a number of muskets and old rifles though they were not formally trained in their use.  The British and colonial troops were armed with the state-of-the-art Martini-Henry breech-loading rifle and two 7 pounder artillery pieces as well as a rocket battery.  Despite a vast disadvantage in weapons technology, the numerically superior Zulus ultimately overwhelmed the poorly led and badly deployed British, killing over 1,300 troops, including all those out on the forward firing line.  The Zulu army suffered around 350 killed, and up to several hundred wounded.  The battle was a crushing victory for the Zulus and caused the abandonment of the first British invasion of Zululand.

The Battle of Isandlwana by Jason Askew. (GM)
Half Price! - 300.00

This Week's Half Price Sport Art

 The 1991 Grand Prix season started with great public expectations supporting, encouraging and urging on Britains one and only Nigel Mansell to win the Formula One World Championship. In the race at Silverstone a fired up Mansell was dominant in front of the ecstatic home crowd winning the race with such style and aplomb. His arch rival Ayrton Senna was completely outclassed and to add insult to injury he ran out of fuel on the last lap, finishing fourth behind our hero. In an unprecedented gesture, Nigel stopped on his victory lap and picked up Senna to get him safely back to the pits through the thronging crowd, so creating one of the most memorable moments in the history of Formula One. Disappointments were to follow throughout the season and it would not be until 1992 that Nigel would eventually lift the coveted crown.

Mansells Taxi Service by Robert Tomlin. (Y)
Half Price! - 110.00
GITW5601GS. A Race at the End by Thomas Blinks.

A race at the End by Thomas Blinks (GS)
Half Price! - 200.00
Cranston Fine Arts purchased the remaining prints of this numbered edition from the publisher and specially arranged for all of our prints to be signed by the artist Robert Highton.  The prints were numbered but not signed on their release several years ago, now making ours the only prints available signed.
Michael Owen - The German Hat Trick by Robert Highton.
Half Price! - 25.00
 A cricketing genius, Sir Garfield Sobers excelled at all aspects of the game.  One of his most memorable moments being the six consecutive sixes hit off one over.

Sir Garfield Sobers by Gary Keane.
Half Price! - 60.00

This Week's Half Price Aviation Art

 Landing and taking off from the hillsides, rather than established airfields, this was extremely dangerous work which involved the pilot following the terrain and contours of the land that was being dressed in order to ensure an even distribution of the chemical.  Australian-born Jim McMahon, served during World War II on B.25 Mitchell bombers before pioneering crop dusting and topdressing in New Zealand with ex-military De Havilland Tiger Moths which he converted himself for the purpose.  He went on to form a company called Crop Culture, which specialised in aerial spraying equipment, both in New Zealand and in the UK, before becoming a partner in the newly-formed Britten-Norman aircraft company which produced the Islander and Trislander utility transport aircraft in England.
Top Dressing in New Zealand (2) by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - 40.00
 No one will ever know exactly what caused Max Immelmanns demise, but what is known is that his propeller was seen to disintegrate, which caused a series violent oscillations that ripped the Fokker E.III apart, the tail breaking away before the wings folded back, trapping the young German ace in his cockpit. The popular belief is that his interrupter gear malfunctioned, causing him to shoot away part of his own propeller, but British reports attribute Immelmanns loss to the gunnery of Cpl J H Waller from the nose of FE.2b 6346 flown by 2Lt G R McCubbin on Sunday, 18th June 1916. Immelmann was flying the spare E.III 246/16 as his own E.IV had been badly shot up earlier that day.

Immelmanns Last Flight by Ivan Berryman. (GL)
Half Price! - 300.00
 The most famous raid of the second world war, the audacious Dambusters raid by Lancasters of No.617 Sqn was to wreak havoc in Germanys industrial heartland.  Two dams will be destroyed on the raid - the Mohne and the Eder, flooding the valleys below and stopping production in their factories, providing an immeasurable morale boost for those back home.  Here, two of the modified bombers pass windmills on the Dutch canals as they make their way to the first target, their almighty roar shattering the stillness and disturbing some of the local wildlife. As they approach Germany in the moonlight, the bombers are well on the way to make history.

Well on the Way to Make History - the Dambusters by David Pentland. (GS)
Half Price! - 250.00
 During operation Ramrod 792 on April 25, 1944, leading his Spitfire wing, Johnnie Johnson had a long-running combat with an FW190. Robert Taylor shows the last moments of the duel which ended in victory for the Allied Air Forces leading fighter Ace.

Ramrod by Robert Taylor
Half Price! - 75.00

 

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