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Samurai Warriors by Chris Collingwood (GS) - ChrisCollingwood.com

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Samurai  Warriors by Chris Collingwood (GS)


Samurai Warriors by Chris Collingwood (GS)

Samurai Warriors of the Sekighahara campaign 1600. The most important and decisive battle in the history of Japan, Sekigahara was the culmination of the Power struggle triggered by the death of the great warlord Toyotomi Hideyoshi. The two rivals for power were Ishida Mitsunari and Tokugawa Ieyasu. The contest was ultimately settled by force of arms in a small mountain valley in central Japan. By the end of the day 40,000 heads had been taken and Ieyasu was master of Japan. Within three years the Emperor would grant him the title he sought - Shogun.
Item Code : DHM1230GSSamurai Warriors by Chris Collingwood (GS) - This Edition
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GICLEE
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Limited edition of 50 giclee canvas prints.

Image size 36 inches x 26 inches (91cm x 66cm)Artist : Chris Collingwood
on separate certificate
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Other editions of this item : Samurai Warriors by Chris Collingwood.DHM1230
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PRINT Signed limited edition of 1150 prints. Image size 25 inches x 16 inches (64cm x 41cm)Artist : Chris Collingwood20 Off!Add any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!Now : 80.00VIEW EDITION...
ARTIST
PROOF
Limited edition of 50 artist proofs. Image size 25 inches x 16 inches (64cm x 41cm)Artist : Chris Collingwood35 Off!Add any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!Now : 105.00VIEW EDITION...
GICLEE
CANVAS
Limited edition of 50 giclee canvas prints. Image size 40 inches x 30 inches (102cm x 76cm)Artist : Chris Collingwood
on separate certificate
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ORIGINAL
PAINTING
Original painting by Chris Collingwood.

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Image size 40 inches x 30 inches (102cm x 76cm)Artist : Chris CollingwoodSOLD
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POSTCARDPostcardPostcard size 6 inches x 4 inches (15cm x 10cm)noneAdd any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!2.00VIEW EDITION...
EX-DISPLAY
PRINT
**Signed limited edition of 1150 prints. (4 copies reduced to clear)

Slightly damaged border, does not affect the image.
Image size 25 inches x 16 inches (64cm x 41cm)Artist : Chris CollingwoodHalf
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Extra Details : Samurai Warriors by Chris Collingwood (GS)
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This Week's Half Price Art

21st July 1842: When bad feeling arose over trade relations between the Honourable East India Company and China, an expedition was mounted to re-establish trading facilities in certain Chinese ports. A force of infantry was accompanied by units of the Royal Artillery and Madras Artillery. An amphibious attack was made up-river towards Canton in 1840, and after first taking the forts which defended it, the city itself was eventually captured. After taking Amoy, the British force moved back to establish itself in Canton. Then, the entire British force sailed to capture Shanghai.  Proceeding up the river Yangtse Kiang, the fleet anchored abreast of the city of Chin-kiang-foo, at the foot of whose walls lay the grand canal. On 21st July 1842 all the troops were disembarked and took up their positions. Colonel Montgomerie, who commanded the artillery brigade, placed his guns in a strong position on a low hill commanding the Western gateway and walls. The infantry escaladed the North angle of the walls and after a sharp struggle the city was captured. Hostilities ended when the force reached Nanking.  For operations in the stifling heat and the swampy banks of Eastern rivers, the smaller and handier artillery equipments were preferred. As well as the smaller howitzers, five 6-pounder guns were also used. Field guns of the Madras Artillery had a distinctive flat, circular brass nave plate.  The Madras Artillery regulations describe the Undress uniforms and horse furniture of the officers. They and their men are wearing forage caps. Gunners and drivers with field batteries were armed with short swords. In marching order the Madras Artillery men were ordered to wear Undress jackets, woollen trousers and carry haversacks (containing provisions). As a gun is loaded, one of the detachment goes to fetch another cartridge from the limber in the rear. An officer of the 18th (The Royal Irish) Regiment, suffering (like many) from heat stroke, is aided by a soldier and a sepoy of the Madras Native Infantry.

The Madras Foot Artillery at the Assault on Chin-Kiang-Foo, 21st July 1842 by David Rowlands. (B)
Half Price! - 20.00
 When 250 well armed and trained rebel tribesmen attacked the small SAS outpost at Mirbat few would have given good odds on their survival.  At the height of the battle Corporal Labalaba and Trooper Savesaki, both Fijians and both wounded fought off relentless assaults by the attacking Adoo.  Firing a World War II vintage 25pdr field gun at point blank range Labalaba finally fell to a snipers bullet just as Captain Kealy and Trooper Tobin reached the gunpit to aid its defence.  Within minutes however Tobin was dead, but Kealy and the remaining defenders critical position was saved by the timely arrival of 2 Omani Strikemaster jets, and helicopters carrying 24 men of G Squadron.

Sacrifice at Mirbat, Dhofar, Oman, 19th July 1972 by David Pentland. (P)
Half Price! - 1800.00
 Montenegro, Yugoslavia, January, 1942. 75mm Skoda Mountain Gun of 5th Alpine artillery Regiment, 5th Alpini Division, 'Pusteria' in action against Tito's partisans.

Alpini by David Pentland. (P)
Half Price! - 700.00
DHM054B. Battle of the Pyramids 21st July 1798 by Louis Lejeune.

Battle of the Pyramids 21st July 1798 by Louis Lejeune (B)
Half Price! - 33.00

DHM1375GS.  C Squadron, 1st The Queens Dragoon Guards, Al Faw Peninsula, Iraq, 2003 by David Rowlands.

C Squadron, 1st The Queens Dragoon Guards, Al Faw Peninsula, Iraq, 2003 by David Rowlands. (GS)
Half Price! - 250.00
The Battle of Hastings: While King Harold II  was defeating the Norse invasion at the battle of Stamford Bridge in the north, the Norman invasion led by the Norman Duke William landed in the south. A Norman force of 7,000 warriors sailed across the English Channel in 450 flat boats and landed at Pevensey in Sussex on September 28th. The following two weeks saw the Norman army organising and raiding the local area for supplies. On hearing of the invasion, King Harold marched south from York to London, a distance of 200 miles, in seven days. And on October 13th with his army of 7,000 men took up position on Senlac Hill, 8 miles north of Hastings. Harold took this position as this was the direct route for London. The following day, the Normans attacked the village (which is now the town of Battle). The Battle of Hastings was a battle between King Harolds infantry and the Norman cavalry and archers. The Saxon line threw back the first charge of Norman knights and as the knights began retiring, the Saxons began to pursue the cavalry but a counter attack by Williams disciplined knights cut down the Saxon infantry. King Harold reformed his line before the second Norman cavalry attack was launched. For many hours King Harolds Saxon infantry held their ground against the repeated cavalry charges, both sides suffered heavy losses. As the evening progressed the battle turned the Normans way, William feigned a withdrawal of his cavalry, the Saxon infantry again could not resist to break ranks and pursue the cavalry. Halfway down the hill Williams knights turned and charged the Saxon infantry. King Harold at this time was mortally wounded from an arrow in the eye and the victory was won by the Normans. Each side lost a quarter of their men and during the fighting William the Conqueror had three horses killed under him. Later he ordered the building of Battle Abbey on the battlefield. The way was clear to London and William the Conqueror was crowned King of England on Christmas day at Westminster Abbey.

Battle of Hastings by Brian Palmer (GS)
Half Price! - 250.00
 The 16th / 5th shown during the operation Objective Lead, The Gulf war 26th February 1991.
Scimitars of the 16th / 5th Queens Royal Lancers in Action by David Rowlands. (GL)
Half Price! - 300.00
DHM652.  The Prussian Trumpeter by Richard Knotel.

The Prussian Trumpeter by Richard Knotel.
Half Price! - 20.00

This Week's Half Price Sport Art

 The Intercontinental Formula was first organised by British Racing Drivers Club to allow the racing of cars with 2000cc to 3000cc engines. At the time the 1500cc limit of Formula 1 had been instituted by the international ruling body in the belief that the smaller cars would mean safer racing. In reality this meant that the relatively easy to handle Formula 1 cars could be driven by less experienced drivers almost as fast as the most experienced master drivers. The result was that the car with fractionally more power was the deciding factor in winning the race, rather than the better driver but this also compromised track safety. The introduction of the Intercontinental Formula was seen as more of a challenge for the drivers, with the larger and more powerful cars requiring greater skill and experience than to drive the 1500cc cars of Formula 1. The 13th International Trophy on Saturday 6th May 1961 was the first race of the season to carry World Championship points and consisted of 80 laps of Silverstone, a total of 233 miles. Stirling Moss, having already won the International Sports Car Race in a Lotus earlier that day, was driving Rob Walkers 2.5 litre Cooper Climax and qualified 2nd on the grid despite being unhappy with the steering of his car. The starting grid front row was Bruce McLaren, Stirling Moss, Jack Brabham and Graham Hill and by the time the race started at 2.30pm a heavy rain meant that the track was not only soaked but also covered in oil and rubber from the previous races. World Champion Jack Brabham made a superb start, passed Moss and was first into Copse and by lap 4 Moss was in 3rd place led by Surtees and Brabham. Due to appalling conditions and poor visibility many of the cars were spinning or leaving the track and by lap 13 Brabham and Moss were 1st and 2nd with the rest of the field some distance behind. Moss now poured on the pressure and for the next few laps he tried to pass as he harried Brabham in a duel for the lead. The pair were now beginning to lap the tailenders and, at around a quarter of the distance Moss was held up by Flockhart, Brabhams team member, who had allowed Brabham to pass. Moss gestured angrily to Flockhart as he was unable to follow Brabham and, as the rain paused for a while the pace became faster. Suddenly and quite dramatically Moss passed both Flockhart and Brabham and within 2 laps had gained 5 seconds on the World Champion. As the rain returned in a deluge Moss mercilessly pushed on, increasing his lead to 1.5 minutes by the halfway mark. Although he could have taken things easily at this point Moss drove on relentlessly at a seemingly impossible pace and was now lapping most of the field for a second time. By the three-quarters stage he completed his humiliation of Brabham by passing him for a second time to lap him representing a 3 mile lead. Moss eventually won the race in 2hrs 41 mins 19.2 secs, 1.5 laps ahead of Brabham and at least two laps ahead of the rest of the field in what were treacherous conditions. At the end of the race Moss summed up the experience as a nice ride, having proved himself to be one of the greatest and fastest drivers in the world under any conditions. Sir Stirling Moss believes this to be one of his finest ever drives.

A Moment of Triumph by Gerald Coulson. (Y)
Half Price! - 75.00
 Damon Hill, World Champion

King of the Track by Stuart Coffield
Half Price! - 20.00
GIFP0940GS. A rest from Fishing  by Alexander F Rolfe (1814 to 1875) (GS)
A rest from Fishing by Alexander F Rolfe (1814 to 1875) (GS)
Half Price! - 200.00
SP4.  Desert Orchid by Mark Churms.

Desert Orchid by Mark Churms.
Half Price! - 35.00

This Week's Half Price Aviation Art

 After service in the 96th Infantry Regiment, Smirnov joined the XIX Corps Air Squadron in 1914, shooting down twelve enemy aircraft in the course of two years. When revolution swept through Russia in November 1917, he escaped the Bolsheviks via a White counter-revolutionary route, eventually joining the RAF in England, serving at the Central Flying School at Upavon. He is shown here in his silver Nieuport 17, having just despatched a Roland C.II.

Captain Ivan Smirnov by Ivan Berryman. (GS)
Half Price! - 250.00
 The Fokker DR.1 Triplane (213/17) of Fritz Kempf swoops on a pair of unsuspecting Sopwith Camels whilst on patrol over the Western Front in 1917. Kempfs  practise of having his name painted across the top wing of his aircraft was supplemented by the taunt Do You Remember Me? on the mid wing. His aircraft is depicted in the colours worn by Jasta Boelcke of the Imperial Air Service.

Ltn Fritz Kempf by Ivan Berryman. (GL)
Half Price! - 300.00
 Cargo Carrier Northeast aircraft over Belfast Lough.

Vickers Viscount by David Pentland. (GS)
Half Price! - 250.00
 Prior to the British attack on the Italian battle fleet moored in Taranto Harbour in November 1940, the job of obtaining the very latest photo reconnaissance fell to the maverick pilot Adrian 'Warby' Warburton.  Flying a requisitioned Martin Maryland, Warburton undertook a series of breathtakingly low level passes across the ships moored in the harbour, cheating a hail of anti aircraft fire and flak to bring home the vital information to Rear Admiral Lumley Lyster, the flag officer aboard HMS Illustrious.  Ships shown moored in the Mar Grande here are Vittorio Veneto (nearest) and Littorio with Duilio and Giulio Cesare in the background.

Prelude to Taranto by Ivan Berryman. (GL)
Half Price! - 300.00

 

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